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TSU

Master of Public Administration

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Constitutional Law (national and comparative perspective)/ sakonstitucio samarTali – (nacionalur da SedarebiT perspeqtivaSi)

 

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr. Karl-Peter Sommermann

Prof. Dr. Irakli Kobachidze

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Karl-Peter Sommermann, DHV Speyer 

sommermann@duv-speyer.de;

Prof. Dr. Irakli Kobachidze, TSU

ikobakhidze@yahoo.com

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

 

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Module I – Foundations of Law

 

Required

 

Aims of the Course

 

 

The course is designed to provide the students of the Public Administration MA programme with basic theoretical and applied knowledge on the essence, fundamental principles and main elements of Constitutional Law. Particular attention will be devoted to the objectives of a State based on the rule of law, especially the protection of human dignity and fundamental rights, the key democratic institutions exercising the state powers in Georgia – Parliament, President, Government, Constitutional Court, Common Courts, regional and local authorities. Each aspect of Constitutional Law will be analysed in a comparative perspective exploring various models of legal solutions applied in different democratic countries. The students will learn to analyze the mechanisms and scope of influence of public international law, especially of the European Convention on Human Rights, on domestic Constitutional Law

 

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 4 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 20
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester  - 55
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Midterm Examination – 10
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Final Examination - 15

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the general principles of constitutional law,     Structure and content of the protection of human rights (which are guaranteed by the constitution) by the institutions exercising the state powers ;

 

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems using of the newest methods and approaches ( in the frame of the paper);

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information. Graduates can make innovative synthesis of information using of the court practice;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Ability for study

Student can analyse the character of studying process and make  stategical planning on high level, direct studying process independently.

Values

Student can avaluation of the own and others atttude about the legal and social values and take a part in establishment of new values.

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Heuristic Method
  • Case study
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Student evaluation will be based on thesis and final exam:

 

Attandance and oral participation /Presentation - 40 %

Paper/MidTerm– 20%

Final Exam – 40%

 

Final Evaluation – 100%

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 4 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 30
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester  - 45
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Midterm Examination – 10
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Final Examination - 15

 

Evaluation

 

 

Student evaluation will be based on thesis and final exam:

 

Attandance and oral participation/Presentation- 40

Paper – 20%

Final Exam – 40%

 

Final Evaluation – 100%

 

 

Mandatory Literature

 

 

-           Avtandil Demetrashvili, Irakli Kobakhidze, Constitutional Law, Tbilisi, 2008.

-           Irakli Kobakhidze, Law of Political Associations, 2008.

-           Konstantine Kublashvili, Human Rights, Tbilisi, 2003.

-           Izoria/Korkelia/Kublashvili/Khubua, Commentaries to the Constitution of Georgia, 2005.

-           Irakli Kobakhidze, Human Rights: Standard Examination Schemes for Hypotheticals. Examination Samples. Institutional Guarantees of Human Rights Implementation, 2010.

-            

-           Norman Dorsen/Michel Rosenfeld/Sajo Andras/Susanne Baer (eds.): Comparative Constitutionalism: Cases and Materials, (American Casebook Series), St Paul 2003 (extracts).

-           Vicki C. Jackson/Mark Tushnet: Comparative Constitutional Law, (University Casebook Series), New York 1999 (extracts).

-           Karl-Peter Sommermann: The Rule of Law and Public Administration in a Global Setting, in: International Institute of Administrative Sciences (ed.), Governance and Public Administration in the 21st Century: New Trends and New Techniques, Brussels 2002, pp. 67-81.

-           Christian Starck: Constitutional Interpretation, in: Starck, Christian (ed.), Studies in German Constituionalism, Baden-Baden 1995, pp. 47-70.

-            

-           European Ombudsman, The European Code of Good Administrative Behaviour, 2005

 

 

Additional Literature and other study materials

 

 

-           J. E. Cooke (Ed.): The Federalist, Middletown/Conn. 1982.

-           Jack Donnelly, Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice , Paperback 2002.

-           Micheline R. Ishay, The History of Human Rights: From Ancient Times to the Globalization Era , Paperback 2004.

-           Eibe Riedel/Rüdiger Wolfrum (eds.), Recent Trends in German and European Conatitutional Law, German Reports Presented to the XVIIth International Congress on Comparative Law (Utrecht, 16 to 22 July 2006), Berlin, Heidelberg, New York 2006.

-           Geoffrey R. Stone, Louis M. Seidman, Cass R. Sunstein, Mark V. Tushnet, Pamela S. Karlan, Constitutional Law, Aspen Publishers, Fifth edition, 2005.

-           Kathleen M. Sullivan, Gerald Gunther, Constitutional Law, University Casebook Series: Foundation Press, Fifteenth Edition, 2004.

-           Cass R. Sunstein, Democracy and the Problem of Free Speech, The Free Press 1995.

 

Recommendations for Students who can read German:

-           Hartmut Maurer, Staatsrecht I: Grundlagen, Verfassungsorgane, Staatsfunktionen, 6. Aufl., München 2010.

-           Bodo Pieroth/Bernhard Schlink, Grundrechte: Staatsrecht II, 25., Aufl., Tübingen 2009.

 

Key Legal Acts

-           Constitution of Georgia

-           Constitutional Law on the Status of the Autonomous Republic of Adjara

-           Law on Normative Acts

-           Regulations of the Parliament

-           Law on Status, Competencies and Rules of Activities of the Government of Georgia

-           Organic Law on Common Courts

-           Organic Law on the Constitutional Court of Georgia

-           Election Code

-           Organic Law on Referendum

-           Organic Law on Political Associations of Citizens

-           The Organic Law on Local Self-government

 

-           European Convention on Human Rights

-           European Charter of Fundamental Rights

 

Jurisprudence

-           German Federal Constitutional Court: Lüth Case (1958), BVerfGE 7, Translation taken from: Donald Kommers: The Constitutional Jurisprudence of the Federal Republic of Germany, London 1989, pp. 368-375.

-           German Federal Constitutional Court: Numerus Clausus Case (1972), BVerfGE 33, 303, Translation taken from: Donald Kommers: The Constitutional Jurisprudence of the Federal Republic of Germany, London 1989, pp. 295-304.

 

 

Results of the Course

 

After successful accomplishment of the course the students will get acquainted with the fundamental principles of Constitutional Law, key institutions exercising state powers as well as the content and structure of human rights guaranteed by modern constitutions. Besides, they will gain practical skills to examine cases in the field of Constitutional Law and Human Rights

 

 

Methods of teaching and studying

 

 

Combination of lectures and interactive teaching methods, especially by using case studies. The students will learn to structure and present a constitutional subject in a short oral presentation.

 

In preparation of the course, students are given a reader with the relevant materials they are expected to study.

 

Additional requirements of completion of the Course

 

 

N/A

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

General Principles of Administrative Law; Introduction to Georgian Administrative Law/

administraciuli samarTli s ZiriTadi principebi;   Sesavali qarTul administraciul samarTalSi

 

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Stelkens

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Stelkens

Deutsche Hochschule für Verwaltungswissenschaften Speyer

Freiherr-vom-Stein-Str. 2

D-67346 Speyer

stelkens@dhv-speyer.de

 

Dr.Tamar Gvaramadze- TSU tgvaramadze@gmail.com

Prof. Dr. Paata Turava – TSU fosta.turava@yahoo.de

 

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Modul I– Foundations of Law

Required

Course Goal

The aim of the lecture is to explain general principles of administrative law, particularly on the basis of the work of the Council of Europe on this subject. These "Pan-European-Administrative-Law-Principles" will be analysed on the basis of the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and the Court of Justice of the European Union, the reports and the documents of the European Ombudsman and - in particular - the jurisprudence of the German administrative courts. Furthermore the lecture will give an overview of different conceptions of administrative law by comparing namely the German, the French and the British way of handling administrative law issues.

 

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 30
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 45
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and Final Examination- 25

Course Admission Prerequisites

Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the   Principles of European administrative law, basic institutions, functions of European Council in the sphere of administrative law ;

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems;

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information. Graduates can make innovative synthesis of information using of the practice of European Court of Human Rights and German Federal court, the reports of European Ombudsman;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Ability for study

Student can analyse the character of studying process and make  stategical planning on high level, direct studying process independently.

Values

Student can avaluation of the own and others atttude about the legal values and take a part in establishment of new values.

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Heuristic Method
  • Case study
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation -40

Midterm - 20

Final Exam - 40

Required Literature

Script.

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

-           See

http://www.dhv-speyer.de/stelkens/AdministrativeLaw/

-           User-Name: TSU

-           Password: admin2

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 


Annex I

 

Contents of the Course

 

Introduction

A) Course Objective

B) Pan-European Administrative Law and European Administrative Law

C) Problems of Teaching Administrative Law in English

§ 1 Fundamental Terms and Definitions

A) What Is Ment by "Administration"?

B) Different Approaches to Administrative Law

C) Forms of Administrative Action

§ 2 The Council of Europe and the Emergence of Pan-European-Principles of Administrative Law

A) Aims and Instruments of the Council of Europe

B) The European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and Its Impact on Administrative Law

C ) Other Conventions in Terms of Art. 15 § a of the Statute of the Council of Europe

D ) Recommendations in Terms of Art. 15 § b of the Statute of the Council of Europe

§ 3 Sources of Administrative Law

A) Relation between Public Law and Private Law

B) Statutory Law Sources: Constitution, Acts of Parliament, Delegated Legislation/Regulations, By-Laws

C) Hierarchy and Collision of Norms

D) Unwritten Administrative Law - Case Law

E) Excursus: Administrative Guidelines

§ 4 Legality of A dministration

A) Priority of Law: Prohibition to Act Against Law

B) Legal Reservation: Prohibition to Act without Legal (Statutory) Basis

C) Consequences of Illegality

§ 5 Administrative Bodies and Distribution of Competences

A)General Aspects

B) Decentralization, Deconcentration, Devolution

C) Competences ratio loci, ratio materiae and ratio instantiae

D) Legitimacy of Outsourcing and Privatization

§ 6 If-then-clauses, Indefinite Legal Terms, Margin of Appreciation, Discretion

A) "Intensity" of the Binding of Administration by Law

B) If-Then-Clauses and Aim-oriented Clauses

C) Indefinite Legal Terms, Margin of Appreciation and Judicial Control (German Approach)

D) Discretion (German Approach)

E) Concept of Discretion of the Council of Europe

F) Excursus: The Principle of Proportionality

§ 7 Legal Certainty and Protection of Legitimate Expectations

A) Legal Certainty in Favour of the Administration? Time-Limit for Appeal

B) Protection of Legitimate Expectations of the Citizen

C) Legal Certainty and Nullity/Inexistence of Administrative Acts and Contracts

§ 8 Administrative Procedure and Individual Rights

A) Right to Fair and Clear Treatment

B) Right to Objectiveness and Neutrality

C) Right to be Heard

D) Right to Advice and Information

E) Obligation of the Administration to give reasons

F) Principle of Investigation

G) Consequences of Defects in Procedure

§ 9 State Liability

A) Reasons for and Foundation of State Liability

B) Responsibility for Unlawful Administrative Measures

C) Responsibility for Accidents

D) Responsibility for Lawful Administrative Measures

E) Responsibility for Legislation

F) Extent and Limits of State Liability

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Judicial Control of Public Administration/ საჯარო მმართველობის სამართლებრივი კონტროლი

 

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr. Karl-Peter Sommermann

 

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Karl-Peter Sommermann, DHV Speyer

sommermann@dhv-speyer.de

Prof. Dr. Maia Kopaleishvili, TSU mkopaleishvili55@gmail.com

 

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

Course for Master Students; mandatory part of the Joint Georgian-German Master Program in Public Administration.

Module I – Foundations of Law

Required

Course Goal

The students will have deep and systematic knowledge about the objectives, principles, procedures and implementation of judicial control of Public Administration. The judicial control is considered on the background of constitutional principles and in the context of other instruments of control on national and international level. The basic elements of en effective judicial protection are discussed on the basis of a comparative analysis.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 15
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 25
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and  final Examination - 35

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites administrative law.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the Principles of national legislation and international standarts, goals of the judicial control of public administration, procedures and the ways to fulfill them ;

Gratuates percieve t he ways of solving particular problems in frame of European Convebtion of Human Right with taking into the consideration the existing international and national precedents ;

 

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems in the frame of the national and international law;

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information. Graduates can make innovative synthesis using of the national and international practice;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Ability for study

Student can analyse the character of studying process and make  stategical planning on high level, direct studying process independently.

Values

Student can avaluation of own and others’ atttude about the democratic and legal values and take a part in establishment of new values.

 

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Heuristic Method
  • Case study
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Student evaluation will be based on an oral presentation and a written examination.

 

Attandance and oral participation - 40 %

Midterm/presentation – 20 %

Final Exam – 40%

 

Final Evaluation – 100%

Required Literature

Recommendations of the Council of Europe

Recommendation Rec(2001)9 of the Committee of Ministers to member states on alternatives to litigation between administrative authorities and private parties

Draft of Recommendation Rec(2001)9 / Explanatory memorandum on the Recommendation Rec(2001)XX

Recommendation Rec(2003) 16 of the Committee of Ministers to member states on the execution of administrative and judicial decisions in the field of administrative law

Recommendation Rec(2004)20 of the Committee of Ministers to member states on judicial review of administrative acts

CM Documents Recommendation Rec(2004)20

National Legislation

Administrative Courts Code of Germany [Verwaltungsgerichtsordnung (VwGO)] of January 21, 1960, with amendments up to 1997

Source:   Speyerer Forschungsberichte No. 180, Speyer 1998, pp.151-215.

The Administrative Procedures Code of Georgia of July 23, 1999

Source:   http://www.gncc.ge/files/7050_3556_252672_administrative%20procedures
%20code
%20of%20georgia.pdf.

Jurisprudence of the European Court of Justice (press releases)

Judgement of 25 July 2002, Case C-50/00 P (Unión de Pequeños Agricultores)

Judgment of 3 September 2008, Joined Cases C-402/05 P and C-415/05 P (Kadi)

Articles

Hauschild, Christoph : Administrative Aspects of an Administrative Courts System, in: Siedentopf/Hauschild/Sommermann (eds.), Implementation of administrative law and judicial control by administrative courts, Speyerer Forschungsberichte Nr. 180, Speyer 1998, pp. 73-90.

Sommermann, Karl-Peter: Implementations of Laws and the Role of Administrative Courts, in: Siedentopf/Hauschild/Sommermann (eds.), Modernization of Legislation and Implementation of Laws, Speyerer Forschungsberichte Nr. 142, Speyer 1994, pp. 93-107.

Sommermann, Karl-Peter: Procedures of Administrative Courts in Germany, in: Siedentopf/Hauschild/Sommermann (eds.), Implementation of administrative law and judicial control by administrative courts, Speyerer Forschungsberichte Nr. 180, Speyer 1998, pp. 55-71.

-             See

http://www.dhv-speyer.de/tiflis

-           User-Name: TSU

Password: admin2

 

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

Eliantonio, Mariolina: Europeanisation of Administrative Justice?, Groningen 2008.

Fromont, Michel: Droit administratif des États européens, Paris 2006, p. 111-207.

Observatoire des Mutations Institutionnelles et Juridiques (ed.), La justice administrative en Europe / Administrative Justice in Europe, Paris 2007.

Sommermann, Karl-Peter: Das Recht auf effektiven Rechtsschutz als Kristallisationspunkt eines gemeineuropäischen Rechtsstaatsverständnisses, in : F. Kirchhof/H.-J. Papier/H. Schäffer (Hrsg.), Rechtsstaat und Grundrechte. Festschrift für Detlef Merten, Heidelberg 2007, p. 443-461.

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents of the Course

§ 1       The objectives of judicial control

              I.     The protection of the objective legal order

              II.    The protection of individual rights

              III.  The judicial review in the system of external controls

§ 2       The development of specialized judicial organs for public law disputes

              I.     Monistic and dualistic judicial systems

              II.    Organisational requirements

              III.  Functional requirements

§ 3       The right to effective judicial protection

              I.     Constitutional guarantees

              II.    International and supranational guarantees

              III.  Content of the right

1.         Completeness of judicial protection

2.         Affectivity of judicial protection

§ 4       The concretisation of the right to judicial protection by procedural law

              I.     Admissible claims

              II.    Procedural principles and requirements

              III.  The “density of control” by the courts as for the merits

              IV.  Instruments of interim relief

              V:   Forms of appeal

§ 5       multilevel governance and judicial control

              I.     The relationship between national and international courts

              II.    Judicial protection of individual rights in the European Union

              III.  Judicial protection of individuals in case of acts issued by an international organisation and having direct concern to them

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

 European cooperation and integration

– Towards a value-based community of states and citizens – / საჯარო მართვის ევროპეიზაცია და ინტერნაციონალიზაცია

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr. iur. Siegfried Magiera, M.A. (Political Science)

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. iur. Siegfried Magiera, M.A. (Political Science)

Jean Monnet Chair of European Law

German University of Administrative Sciences Speyer

magiera@uni-speyer.de

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

MA in Public Administration (implemented in partnership with the German University of Public Administration Speyer)

Module II- Public Administration in the European Context

Mandatory

Course Goal

The participants will have deep and systematic knowledge about the challenges of modern public administration in all countries, including Georgia and also about the regional and international organizations.

in view of the growing interdependence with other countries as well as regional and universal international organizations. Public administration can and will be efficient, competitive and successful in the long run only, if it integrates transnational as much as domestic aspects into its planning and activities.

The aim of the course is to pay special attention on the partnership between the EU and Georgia.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 15
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 20
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Midterm Examination- 15
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Final Examination- 25

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the principles and policy of EU, basic institutions of EU, necessities for new member states according the EU legislation, EU citizens and fundamental rights, European neighborhood policy, in particular, about the legal mechanisms of the participation of Georgia. Principles and goals ;

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems;

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information. Graduates can make innovative synthesis using of the demands of European Court of Human rights;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Ability for study

Student can analyse the character of studying process and make  stategical planning on high level, direct studying process independently.

Values

Student can avaluation of own and others’ atttude about the legal values in EU legislation and take a part in establishment of new values.

Course Content

See Annex 1

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Heuristic Method
  • Case study
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation -40

Midterm/ presentation - 20

Final Exam - 40

Required Literature

Consolidated versions of the “Treaty on European Union” (TEU) and

the “Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union” (TFEU) with 37

Protocols, 65 Declarations and Tables of Equivalences as well as the

“Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union” (Charter)

published in the Official Journal of the European Union. No. C 83 of 30

March 2010 pp. 1-403.

This – or any equivalent – collection of the basic EU treaty texts is indispensable for participation in the course, i.e. for preparing the introductory presentation, for participating in class discussion and for writing the subsequent test paper.

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

As the Treaty of Lisbon has been in force only since the end of 2010

there are few suitable text books available. For participation in the

course it will be sufficient, however, to use the EU treaty texts

(mentioned above) and documents accessible via internet on the home

Page of the European Union (http://europa.eu).

Additional Information/Conditions

Additional Information/Conditions Related to the Course (If Any).

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

European Law of Human Rights/ adamianis uflebebis evropuli samarTali

 

Author/Authors

Prof. Konstantin Korkelia

 

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Konstantin Korkelia

E-mail: kkorkelia@hotmail.com

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Module II – Public Administration in the European Context

Required

Course Goal

The aim of the course is give the students deep and systematic knowledge about the selected topic of European Law of Human Rights.

 

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 20
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 20
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Midterm Examination - 15
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Final Examination- 20

 

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the   Principles of European Law of Human Rights;

Gratuates percieve t he ways of solving particular problems in the frame of European Law;

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems using of the case law in the frame of the European Human Rights law;

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information. Graduates can make innovative synthesis of Information using of the practice of European Court of Human Rights;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Ability for study

Student can analyse the character of studying process and make  stategical planning on high level, direct studying process independently.

Values

Student can avaluation of the own and others atttude about the legal values in Human Rights Sphere and take a part in establishment of new values.

 

Course Content

See Annex I.

 

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Heuristic Method
  • Case study
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Student evaluation will be based on:

 

Attandance – 10%;

oral participation - 25 %

Mid term exam  - 25 %

Final Exam - 40%

Required Literature

  • M. Shaw, International Law, Cambridge University Press, latest ed.; 

 

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

  • Brownlie, Principles of Public International Law, Clarendon Press: Oxford, 2011.
  • D. Harris, Cases and Materials of International Law, Latest ed.;
  • Aust, Modern Treaty Law and Practice, 2000;
  • H. Schermers & N. Blokker, International Institutional Law, 2007;
  • International Law Dictionary, (in Georgian), 2003;
  • K. Korkelia, New Trends Regarding the Relationship between International and National Law; Review of Central and East European Law; Journal of Leiden University, 1997, N2/3;
  • K. Korkelia, International Treaty in International and National Law, Tbilisi University Press (in Georgian), 1998;
  • K. Korkelia, International Law in the Georgian Legal Order, Columbia University Journal of East European Law, Vol. 6, N4, 1999;
  • K. Korkelia, Treaty Law and Practice in Georgia, Review of Central and East European Law; Journal of Leiden University, 1999, N3;
  • Georgia and International Law, K. Korkelia (Ed.), (in Georgian), 2001;
  • K. Korkelia, New Challenges to the Regime of Reservations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, European Journal of International Law, 2002, Vol. 13, N2;

 

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

Contents of the Course

 

Lecture 1 – Introduction in international Law of Human Rights (Universal and

                    Regional Systems)

Lecture 2 – European Convention on Human Rights: Institutional system and

                     the rights protected

Lecture 3 – Requirements for applying to the European Court of Human Rights

Lecture 4 – Right to respect for private and family life

Lecture 5 –  Case Study

Lecture 6 – Freedom of Thought, Consience and Religion

Lecture 7 –  Prohibition of Torture

Lecture 8 – Georgian experience in the European Court of Human Rights

Lecture 9 - Freedom of Assembly and Association

Lecture 10 Case-Study

Lecture 11 – Georgia and Protection of Human Rights

Lecture 12 - Right to a Fair Trial

Lecture 13 -  Freedom of Expression

Lecture 14 - Other European Human Rights Instruments of the Council of Europe

Lecture 15 – Influence of European HR standards on Georgian practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

European Union and its Public Administration /

evrogaerTianeba da misi sajaro mmarTveloba

Author/Authors

Ekaterine Svanidze

Lecturer/Lecturers

Ekaterine Svanidze, invited lecturer.

899 58 05 35, eko.svanidze@gmail.com

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Modul  II – Public Administration in the European Context

Required

Course Goal

Students will have deep and systematic knowledge about the institutional aspect of the European Union .

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 2 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 10
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 15
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Midterm Examination- 10
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Final Examination- 15

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the constitutional aspects of EU, characters of its working, EU legislation and its basic institutions ( EU Parliament, European Council, European Courts);

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information about the important aspects for European integration.

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Ability for study

Student can analyse the character of studying process and make  stategical planning on high level, direct studying process independently.

Values

Student can avaluation of own and others’ atttude about the democratic and legal values and take a part in establishment of new values.

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Heuristic Method
  • Case study
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation/ presentation -40

Midterm - 20

Final Exam - 40

Required Literature

Consolidated versions of the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union – available at http://eur-lex.europa.eu/en/treaties/index.htm ;

C. Tobler, Jacques Beglinger, “Essential EC Law in Charts” – available at my personal library.

P. Craig, G. De Burca, “EU Law, Text, Cases and Materials” – available at my personal library.

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

TBA

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

Contents of the Course

 

N

Topic of the Lecture/Seminar/Practicum/Laborotory work etc.

Literature (with according page numbers)

1

Introduction to the European Union, it’s history and development and Constitutional aspects.

Treaty On European Union (TEU) – Articles 1-8, 47-55;

C. Tobler, Jacques Beglinger, “Essential EC Law in Charts” – pages 19-20, 26-28.

P. Craig, G. De Burca, “EU Law, Text, Cases and Materials”; pages 1-36.

Van gend en Loos v Nederlandse Administratie der Belastingen [1963] ECR 1.

 

2

The Primacy of EU Law (from the perspective of European Court of Justice and National Courts).

 

TEU – Article 4;

C. Tobler, Jacques Beglinger, “Essential EC Law in Charts” – pp. 87-89;

P. Craig, G. De Burca, “EU Law, Text, Cases and Materials”; pages 344-377.

Costa vs ENEL [1964] ECR 585.

 

3

EU’s Single Institutional Framework with extra emphasis on the composition of the members of institutional bodies and their eligibility and working standards requirements (part I, Commission, Council and the European Council).

 

TEU – Articles 13-19; TEFU –Articles 244-250; 237-243; 235-236.

C. Tobler, Jacques Beglinger, “Essential EC Law in Charts” – pp. 67-74;

P. Craig, G. De Burca, “EU Law, Text, Cases and Materials”; pages 38-57.

4

EU’s Single Institutional Framework with extra emphasis on the composition of the members of institutional bodies and their eligibility and working standards requirements (part II, European Parliament and the Courts).

TEU – Articles 13-19; TEFU – Aricles 223-234, 251-281, 285-287.

C. Tobler, Jacques Beglinger, “Essential EC Law in Charts” – pp. 67-74;

P. Craig, G. De Burca, “EU Law, Text, Cases and Materials”; pages 57-80.

 

5

Decision-Making and Legislation

 

TFEU (Treaty on Functioning of the European Union)  – 114-115, 288-294,  352-353;

C. Tobler, Jacques Beglinger, “Essential EC Law in Charts” – pp. 77-85;

P. Craig, G. De Burca, “EU Law, Text, Cases and Materials”; pages 108-143;

Commission v Council [2004] ECR I-4829.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Governance in the EU multi-level system / მართვა სხვადასხვა დონის სისტემებში

 

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr. Nana Macharashvili

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Nana Macharashvili TSU

nana.macharashvili@tsu.ge

Dr. Tanja Klenk

tklenk@uni-potsdam.de

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Master Program in Public Administration.

Modul  II – Public Administration in the European Context

 

Required

Course Goal

This course has two main perspectives: one is to look at the nature of EU multilevel governance from a theoretical and empirical perspective. The second aim is to ask what does actually happen when Europe “hits home”.

The course overviews the discussion on the following themes: the specific nature of democracy and the ‘deficits’ of democracy, different modes of governance and policy-making of and within the institutions of the European Union, , the ‘Europeanization’ of national politics, procedures and results of EU integration and regionalization caused by EU integration.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 4 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 20
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 40
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and Final Examination- 40

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the following issues in political sciencies:

·          theoretical approaches to EU multi-level governance;

·          concepts of Europeanization;

·          institutional structure of the EU;

·          democratic theory and EU integration;

·          accession policy of the EU and transformation of the East and South European member states;

·          adaptation of ministerial bureaucracies and parliaments to the EU institutional setting; regionalisation reforms of new member states

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Values

Student can avaluation of the own and others atttude about the legal and democratic values and take a part in establishment of new values.

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Heuristic Method
  • Case study
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation -40

Midterm/presentation - 20

Final Exam - 40

Required Literature

Auel, Katrin/Benz, Arthur. 2005. The Politics of Adaptation: The Europeanisation of National Parliamentary Systems, in: Journal of Legislative Studies, 11:3/4, 372-393.

 

Grabbe, Heather. 2003. Europeanization Goes East. Power and Uncertainty in the EU Accession Process. In: Featherstone, Kevin; Radaelli, Claudio M. (Hrsg.): The Politics of Europeanization. Oxford, New York: Oxford University. Press, pp. 303-327.

 

Hix, Simon/Høyland, Bjørn. 2011. The Political System of the European Union, 3rd ed., London: Palgrave.

 

Moravcsik, A. 1994. Why the European Union Strengthens the State. Domestic Politics and International Cooperation. Center for European Studies. Cambridge. (CES Working Paper Series, 52). http://www.ces.fas.harvard.edu/publications/docs/pdfs/Moravcsik52.pdf .

Radaelli, Claudio. 2003. The Europeanization of Public Policy. In: Featherstone, Kevin/Radaelli, Claudio (eds.): The Politics of Europeanization. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 27-56.

 

Vivien A. Schmidt. 2005. Democracy in Europe: The Impact of European Integration. In: Perspectives on Politics, 3(4), S. 761-778.

 

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

http://europa.eu/ (access to relevant documents in different languages)

 

See also below (Topics 1 to 9)

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

 


Annex I

 

Contents of the Course

 

N

Topic of the Seminar

Literature

1

Part 1 (Monday) – The political system of the EU – an overview

(lecture, group work)

a.        Institutional setting of the EU and its development

b.       Involvement of national and supranational actors into EU policymaking

 

 

Hix, Simon/Høyland, Bjørn. 2011. The Political System of the European Union, 3rd ed., London: Palgrave (extracts).

 

Rainer Eising, Interest groups in EU policy-making, Living Review in European Governance 3 (4), 2008.   http://europeangovernance.livingreviews.org/Articles/lreg-2008-4/

 

2

Part 2 (Monday) – Europeanization – what it is and what it is not

(lecture, 1 oral presentation, group work)

  1. Theoretical concepts and definitions
  2. EU integration – Europeanization as different approaches

c.        “multi-level governance”

 

Börzel, Tanja A./Risse, Thomas. 2007. Europeanization: The Domestic Impact of European Union Politics, in: Jǿrgensen, Knud E./Pollack, Mark/Rosamond, Ben (eds.): The SAGE Handbook of European Union Politics. London: Sage, pp. 483-504.

 

Radaelli, Claudio. 2003. The Europeanization of Public Policy. In: Featherstone, Kevin/Radaelli, Claudio (eds.): The Politics of Europeanization. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 27-56.

3

Part 3 (Tuesday) – National executives as winners of EU integration?

(lecture, 2 oral presentations, students’ panel discussion)

  1. Redistribution of resources between national parliaments and governments

·          Ideas

·          Institutions

·          Initiative

·          Information

  1. Institutional adaptation of national government organisation to the EU

·          Two-track system vs. one track system (oral presentation)

·          How the national government is linked to the EU Commission and the EU Council

  1. Involvement of national bureacrats in EU policymaking- still the primacy of politics?

·          Working groups attached to the Commission and the Council (oral presentation)

·          Comitology

·          Seconded officials

  1. Students’ panel discussion (4 participants):

Transferring experiences with former EU accession policy to the Georgian case: How could the ministerial bureaucracy of Georgia be adapted to the EU policymaking process? What challenges are to be expected?

 

Moravcsik, A. 1994. Why the European Union Strengthens the State. Domestic Politics and International Cooperation. Center for European Studies. Cambridge. (CES Working Paper Series, 52). http://www.ces.fas.harvard.edu/publications/docs/pdfs/Moravcsik52.pdf .

 

Derlien, Hans-Ulrich. 2000. Germany. Failing Successfully?, in: Hussein, Kassim /Peters, B. Guy / Wright, Vincent (Hrsg.): The National Co-ordination of EU Policy. The Domestic Level. Oxford, 54-78.

 

Papadimitriou, Dimitris, and Phinnemore, David. 2004. Europeanization, Conditionality and Domestic Change: The Twinning Exercise and Administrative Reform in Romania, in: JCMS Volume 42. Number 3. pp. 619–39.

 

 

4

Part 4 (Wednesday) – National bureaucracies in the EU – self-understanding, role definitions and Europeanization

(lecture, 2 oral presentations)

  1. Role models: classical vs. politicized bureaucrats
  2. Case study: Hungary (oral presentation)
  3. Europeanization of role definitions
  4. Multiple roles
  5. Role definitions of seconded officials – comparative empirical results (oral presentation)

Meyer-Sahling, J.H. 2007. The changing colours of the post-communist state: The politicisation of the senior civil service in Hungary. In: European Journal of Political Research. 47(1): 1-33.

 

Gajduschek, G. 2007. Politicisation, professionalisation, or both? Hungarys civil service system. Communist and Post-Communist Studies. 40(3): 343-362.

 

Trondal, Jarle. 2006. Governing at the Frontier of the European Commission: The Case of Seconded National Experts, in: West European Politics 29 (1), 147-160.

 

Karin Geuijen/Paul t´Hart/Sebastiaan Princen/Kutsal Yesilkagit. 2008. The New Eurocrats. National Civil Servants in EU Policy-making, Amsterdam 2008.

 

 

5

Part 5 (Wednesday) – National parliaments in the EU: post-parliamentarism or re-parliamentarization?

(lecture, 1  oral presentation)

a.        “Post-parliamentarism”

b.       “re-parliamentarization”

c.        Multi-level parliamentarism

d.       Parliaments in the new member states – transformation and Europeanization

e.        Strong and weak parliaments in the EU (oral presentation)

Andersen , Svein S. / Burns, Tom R. 1996. The European Union and the Erosion of Parliamentary Democracy: A Study of Post-parliamentary Governance. In: Andersen, Svein S. / Eliassen, Kjell A. (Hrsg.): The European Union: How Democratic Is It? London u.a., pp. 227-251.

 

Raunio, Tapio. 2005. Holding Governments Accountable in European Affairs. Explaining Cross-National Variation, in: Journal of Legislative Studies, 11, pp. 319-342.

 

Raunio, T./Hix, S. 2000. Backbenchers Learn to Fight Back. European Integration and Parliamentary Government. In: West European Politics. 23(4): 142-168.

 

6

Part 6 (Thursday) – National parliaments in the EU: organizational adaptation, formal and informal channels

(1 oral presentation, group work)

  1. Organisational adaptation
  2. Committee structure: EU comittees and specialised committees
  3. Parliamentary working units, parliamentary party groups and adaptational mechanisms
  4. Informal strategies and channels to EU actors and institutions
  5. Subsidiarity control and national legislation (oral presentation)

Auel, Katrin/Benz, Arthur. 2005: The Politics of Adaptation: The Europeanisation of National Parliamentary Systems, in: Journal of Legislative Studies, 11:3/4, 372-393.

 

Auel, Katrin. 2006. The Europeanisation of the German Bundestag: Institutional Change and Informal Adaptation. In: German Politics, 15, pp. 249-268.

 

Kropp, Sabine. 2010. German Parliamentary Party Groups in Europeanised Policymaking – Awakening from the Sleep? Institutions and Heuristics as MPs’ Resources, in: German Politics, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 123-147.

 

Raunio, Tapio. 2010. Destined for Irrelevance? Subsidiarity Control by National Parliaments (WP),

http://www.realinstitutoelcano.org/wps/portal/rielcano_eng/Content?WCM_GLOBAL_CONTEXT=/elcano/Elcano_in/Zonas_in/DT36-2010

 

http://www.cosac.eu/en/info/earlywarning/

 

7

Part 7 (Thursday) – Accession politics of the EU

(lecture, 2 oral presentations)

  1. Copenhagen criteria

·          Democracy

·          Rule of law

·          Human rights

·          Protection of minorities

  1. Experiences of the CEE member states
  2. Current debate on EU enlargement

Grabbe, Heather. 2003. Europeanization Goes East. Power and Uncertainty in the EU Accession Process. In: Featherstone, Kevin; Radaelli, Claudio M. (Hrsg.): The Politics of Europeanization. Oxford, New York: Oxford University. Press, pp. 303-327.

 

http://ec.europa.eu/enlargement/press_corner/key-documents/reports_nov_2010_en.htm

http://ec.europa.eu/enlargement/press_corner/key-documents/index_archive_en.htm

 

8

Part 8 (Friday) – Europeanization and regionalization of EU member states

(1 oral presentation, students’ panel discussion)

  1. Regional adaptation
  2. NUTS
  3. The Hungarian case (oral presentation)
  4. Students’ panel discussion (4 participants) : Regionalization as a precondition for accession . How could Georgia be regionalized? Which problems would Georgia face?

Arpad Rozsas. 2004. Regional Policy in Hungary: Institutional Preparations for EU Accession. In: Attila Agh (ed.), Europeanization and Regionalization. Hungary’s Preparation for EU Accession. Budapest, pp. 78-112.

 

Ilona Palne Kovacs. 2005. Regional capacity-building in South-Transdanubia. In: Attila Agh (ed.), Institutional Design and Regional Capacity-Building in the Post-Accession Period. Budapest, pp. 205-224.

9

Part 9 (Friday) – The democratic deficit in the EU

(lecture,1 oral presentation)

  1. Models of democracy

·          Representative democracy

·          Direct democracy

·          Associative democracy

·          Input – output legitimacy

·          Combination of different models and its implications

  1. Compound and simple democracies in the EU (oral presentation)
  2. Post-democracy?

Commission of the European Communities. 2001. European Governance. A White Paper, Brüssel, http://europa.eu.int/comm/governance/white_paper/ en.pdf.

 

Vivien A. Schmidt. 2005. Democracy in Europe: The Impact of European Integration. In: Perspectives on Politics, 3(4), S. 761-778.

 

 

Colin Crouch. 2004. Post-Democracy, Oxford 2004 (extract)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Competition Policy, Regulation and Public Enterprises/ konkurenciis politika, regulireba da sajaro iniciativebi

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr.Dr. h.c. Andreas Knorr

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Andreas Knorr- Speyer

knorr@uni-speyer.de

 

Prof. Dr. Davit Narmania –TSU

davit.narmania@tsu.ge

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Module III – State and Economics

Required

Course Goal

The students will have deep and systematic knowledge on the theory of market failure. They learn how to identify market failure and which instruments exist to overcome it. Different forms of market organization can be identified by the students, they know which consequences collusion and cartels, the abuse of dominant positions and market concentration have. Regulatory measures, their consequences and preconditions are focused on with a view to the economic theory of competition as well as with a view to the implementation of these instruments through the government or specific regulatory bodies. Furthermore, the students learn about the limits of competition policy and regulation, e.g. regulatory failure, and the need for competition policy in specific sectors, such as net infrastructure.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester-20
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 25
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and Final Examination- 40

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the theory of market failure . Graduates can define the market failure and the instruments to overcome it. They know Different forms of market organization, consequences of collusion and cartels;

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems in the sphere of competitive policy;

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation- 40

Midterm - 20

Final Exam – 40

Required Literature

·          Ellig, J. (Hrsg.): Dynamic competition and public policy: technology, innovation, and antitrust issues, Cambridge (Mass.), 2001.

·          Gal, M.: Competition Policy for Small Market Economies, Cambridge (Mass.) und London, 2003.

·          High, J. (Hrsg.): Competition, Cheltenham/Northhampton 2002.

·          Laffont, J.-J.: Regulation and Development, Cambridge u.a. 2005.

·          Motta, M.: Competition Policy. Theory and Practice, Cambridge 2004.

·          OECD: Competition and Trade Policies. Their Interaction, Paris 1984.

·          Parkin, M./Powell, M./Matthews, K. (2005), Economics, 6th Edition, Harlow (Essex, England).

·          Shermer, M. (2008), The Mind of the Market – Compassionate Apes, Competitive Humans, and Other Tales from Evolutionary Economics, New York.

·          Scherer, F.: Competition Policies for an Integrated World Economy, Washington 1994.

·          Scherer, F./D. Ross: Industrial market structure and economic performance, 3. Auflage, Boston 1990.

·          Viscusi, W.K./J. Harrington/J. Vernon: Economics of Regulation and Antitrust, 4th edition, Cambridge (Mass.) und London 2005.

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

Official Website of the European Union on Competition Policy: http://ec.europa.eu/competition/index_en.html

Current Volume of the Jounal “World Competition”

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annex I

 

Contents of the Course

 

N

Topic of the Lecture/Seminar/Practicum/Laborotory work etc.

Literature (with according page numbers)

1

I.          Market Organisation and Market Failure

- Market Organisation and the Consequences for the Economy

- Theory of Market Failure

- Natural Monopolies, Externalities, …

 

 

Ellig, J. (Hrsg.): Dynamic competition and public policy: technology, innovation, and antitrust issues, Cambridge (Mass.), 2001.

 

Shermer, M. (2008), The Mind of the Market – Compassionate Apes, Competitive Humans, and Other Tales from Evolutionary Economics, New York.

Scherer, F./D. Ross: Industrial market structure and economic performance, 3. Auflage, Boston 1990.

 

2

II. Regulation

- Theory of Regulation – Positive Theory, Normative Theory

- Aims of Regulation

- Regulatory Instruments

- Regulatory Failure

- Public Sector Regulation

 

Viscusi, W.K./J. Harrington/J. Vernon: Economics of Regulation and Antitrust, 4th edition, Cambridge (Mass.) und London 2005.

Laffont, J.-J.: Regulation and Development, Cambridge u.a. 2005.

 

3

III.         Competition Policy

           1)   Actors and Aims of Competition Policy

           2)   Competition Policy on Specific Sectors – Case Studies

           3)   Competition Policy in the European Union

 

Gal, M.: Competition Policy for Small Market Economies, Cambridge (Mass.) und London, 2003.

High, J. (Hrsg.): Competition, Cheltenham/Northhampton 2002.

Motta, M.: Competition Policy. Theory and Practice, Cambridge 2004.

OECD: Competition and Trade Policies. Their Interaction, Paris 1984.

Scherer, F.: Competition Policies for an Integrated World Economy, Washington 1994.

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Introduction to Economics/ ekonomikuri politikis safuZvlebi

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Andreas Knorr

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Andreas Knorr

knorr@uni-speyer.de

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Module III – State and Economics

Required

Course Goal

The students get deep and systematic knowledge about the key concepts of economics, the models used as well as the most important theoretical concepts, indicators used in economic analysis, and the politico-economic decision-making process. In particular, the role and the different functions of the government are focused on. The students learn how to differentiate between government failure and market failure and get a first overview on instruments to overcome it, respectively..

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester-20
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester-20
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and Final Examination- 35

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the b asic concepts of economic ; indicators used in economic analysis, and the politco-economic decision-making process .

Gratuates percieve main defferences between the government failure and martket failure and effective ways of solving them;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation- 40

Midterm - 20

F inal examination -40

Required Literature

  • Crampton, E. (2007), Market Failure, in: D.S. Clark (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Law and Society, Thousand Oakes (CA, USA), pp 983 – 985.
  • Koeppel, S./Ürge-Vorsatz, D. (2007), Assessment of Policy Instruments for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings – Report for the UNEP-Sustainable Buildings and Construction Initiative, Internetdokument: http://www.unep.org/themes/consumption/pdf/SBCI_CEU_Policy_Tool_Report.pdf, pp. 91, 25.03.2010.
  • OECD (2009), OECD Factbook 2009 – Economic, Environmental and Social Statistics, Paris.
  • Parkin, M./Powell, M./Matthews, K. (2005), Economics, 6th Edition, Harlow (Essex, England).
  • Shermer, M. (2008), The Mind of the Market – Compassionate Apes, Competitive Humans, and Other Tales from Evolutionary Economics, New York.
  • Sowell, T. (2004), Basic Economics – A Citizen’s Guide to the Economy, revised and expanded Edition, New York.

·          The Economist (2009), Pocket World in Figures, 2010 Edition, London.

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

  • Coyle, D. (2002), Sex, Drugs & Economics – An Unconventional Introduction to Economics, New York.
  • Le Grand, J. (1991), The Theory of Government Failure, in: British Journal of Political Science, Vol. 21, No. 4, pp. 423-442.
  • Wheelan, C. (2002), Naked Economics – Undressing the Dismal Science, New York.
  • OECD Data Base, World Bank Data Base

 

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

 


Annex I

 

Contents of the Course

 

N

Topic of the Lecture/Seminar/Practicum/Laborotory work etc.

Literature (with according page numbers)

1

I.          Key Concepts of Economics

- Unlimited Human Desires

- Scarcity of Resources

- The Knowledge/Information Problem

- Formal vs. Informal Rules

- The Crucial Role of Incentives and Disincentives

 

Parkin, M./Powell, M./Matthews, K. (2005), Economics, 6th Edition, Harlow (Essex, England).

 

2

II.       How Useful Are Economic Statistics – And How Exact Are Country Comparisons?

- Size of Government

- Growth and Poverty: GDP

- (Un)Employment

- Inflation

 

OECD (2009), OECD Factbook 2009 – Economic, Environmental and Social Statistics, Paris.

The Economist (2009), Pocket World in Figures, 2010 Edition, London.

3

III.       Government Functions

 

Parkin, M./Powell, M./Matthews, K. (2005), Economics, 6th Edition, Harlow (Essex, England).

4

IV.       Market Failure vs. Government Failure

- Why Do Markets Fail? What Can and Should Governments Do About It?

- Why Do Governments Fail? What Can and Should Be Done About it? (A Rent-Seeking/Public Choice Perspective)

 

Crampton, E. (2007), Market Failure, in: D.S. Clark (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Law and Society, Thousand Oakes (CA, USA), pp 983 – 985.

Shermer, M. (2008), The Mind of the Market – Compassionate Apes, Competitive Humans, and Other Tales from Evolutionary Economics, New York.

Le Grand, J. (1991), The Theory of Government Failure, in: British Journal of Political Science, Vol. 21, No. 4, pp. 423-442

 

 

 

5

V.       Economic Policy

- The Objectives of Economic Policy

- General Economic Policy vs. Sector-Specific Economic Policies

- The Instruments of Economic Policy

a.)  Fiscal Instruments: Taxes and State Aids

b.)  Regulatory and other Non-Fiscal Instruments

         .- Globalization and Domestic Economic Policy

 

Koeppel, S./Ürge-Vorsatz, D. (2007), Assessment of Policy Instruments for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings – Report for the UNEP-Sustainable Buildings and Construction Initiative, Internetdokument: http://www.unep.org/themes/consumption/pdf/SBCI_CEU_Policy_Tool_Report.pdf, pp. 91, 25.03.2010.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Process Management and e-government

(procesis menejmenti da eleqtronuli marTva)

Author/Authors

Friederike Thessel

Lecturer/Lecturers

Friederike Thessel

Potsdam eGovernment Competence Center (IfG.CC)

Am Neuen Markt 9c

D-14467 Potsdam

Telefon: +49 (0)331 740 367 63

Telefax: +49 (0) 331 240 649

E-Mail: fthessel@ifg.cc

 

Merab Labadze

mlabadze@gmail.com

 

Course Code

 

Course Status

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration. Modul IV – Organization and Management

Required

Course Goal

The course aims to explain changes and developments of public administration induced by Process Management and eGovernment. The first session (out of five in total) outlines the context in which these developments are embedded (e.g. New Public Management). Sessions two and three turn to Process Management. Students are made familiar with the merits of Process Management, with what Process Management attempts to overcome and with how it has been implemented in public administration. Sessions four and five deal with eGovernment, its chances for modernising public administration but also with the pitfalls which might arise in this area.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

·       4 ECTS

·       Contact Hours perSemester-20

·       Hours of Student’s Independent Work perSemester- 40

·       Time for Preparingand TakingFinal Examination- 40

Course Admission Prerequisites

·       Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the the following thems in Process Manamgment and eGovernment:

-               advantages of Process Management and eGovernment for public administration;

-               the hindrances in implementing Process Management and eGovernment;

-               the limits of applying Process Management and eGovernment in public administration as opposed to the private sector;

-               the importance of national characteristics for change processes;

-                

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems in the sphere of Process Management and eGovernment ;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

 

Course Content

see Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • t he Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Attendance and participation/ presentation 40%

Midterm – 20%

Final examination 40%;

Required Literature

Bekkers, V (2005): The Governance of Back Office Integration in E-Government: Some Dutch Experiences, In: Wimmer, M.A. et al. (Eds.) EGOV 2005, LNCS 3591, pp. 12-25. Berlin, Amsterdam. 

Castells, M. (1996): The Information Technology Revolution, In: Castells, M: The Rise of the Network Society, Vol 1: Informational Age, Oxford, pp. 29-65. 

Davenport, T (1993): Information Technology as an Enabler of Process Innovation, In: Process Innovation. Reengineering Work through Information Technology. Boston, pp. 37-93. 

Hammer, Michael; Champy James (2001): Reengineering the Corporation - A Manifesto for Business Revolution, New York.

Janssen, M; Wagenaar, R (2004): An Analysis of a Shared Services Centre in E-government, In: Proceedings of the 37th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences.

Lenk, K (2002): Electronic Service Delivery – A driver of public sector modernization, In: Information Polity 7, pp. 87-96.

Lenk, K (2007): Reconstructing Public Administration Theory from below,  In: Information Polity 12, pp. 207-212.

Lenk, K; Schuppan, T (2010): An Unsucessful Effort to Implement One Stop Government in Germany. Paper for EGPA 2010, 8-10 September 2010, Toulouse (France)

Lips, M.; Boogers, M; Weterings, R (2000): Reinventing territory in Dutch local government: Experiences with the development and implementation of GIS in the Amsterdam region, In: Information Infrastructure and Policy 6, pp. 171-183.

Taylor, J (1998): Informatization as X-ray: What is Public Administration for the Information Age?, In: Snellen, I.Th.M. and van de Donk, W.B.H.J.: Public Administration in an Information Age. Amsterdam; pp. 21-32.

Zuurmond, A (1998): From Bureaucracy to Infocracy: Are Democratic Institutions Lagging Behind?, In:  Snellen, I.Th.M. and van de Donk, W.B.H.J.: Public Administration in an Information Age. Amsterdam; pp. 199-211.

Other Teaching Materials

Powerpoint-slides are being distributed; an additional reader with optional literature may be compiled if requested.

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

 


Annex I

Contents of the Course

 

N

Topic of the Lecture/Seminar/Practicum/Laboratory work etc.

Material

1

Understanding e-government (2 h)

·          Differences of private and public sector

  • From ‘old’ to ‘new’ administrations
  • Basic terms and concepts
  • Process perspective as theory from below
  • Basic organizational principles

Handout

Literature:

§ Lenk 2002

§ Lenk 2007

§ Taylor 1998

§ Zuurmond 1998

§ Castells 1996

2

Access to public services (2 h)

  • Physical access channels
  • Other access channels

Networked organization

  • Single contact center
  • SSC
  • New forms of outsourcing

Handout

Literature:

§ Bekkers 2005

§ Janssen/Wagenaar 2004

3

Selected fields (I)

  • E-government in Georgia (support by tandem partner)
  • Implementing e-government

Handout

4

Selected fields (II) (2 h)

  • Geographic information systems
  • eHealth/Telemedicine

Handout

Literature:

§ Lips/ Boogers/ Weterings 2000

5

Business process management (I) (2 h)

  • Application to public administration
  • Processes  (Types of processes, modes of processes)

Handout

Literature:

§ Hammer/Champy 2001

§ Davenport 1993

6

Business process management (II) (6 h)

  • Process modeling approach
  • Notations for process modeling
  • Implementation of process management
  • Exercise: Process modeling

Handout

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Strategy Management und Quality Management/

strategiisa da xarisxis marTvis menejmenti

Author/Authors

Dr. Kai Masser

Lecturer/Lecturers

Dr. Kai Masser – Uni Speyer

masser@uni-speyer.de

 

Larisa Pataraia

larisa_pataraia@iliauni.edu.ge

 

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Module  IV – Organization and Management

Required

Course Goal

These days new challenges and opportunities call for a more effective and efficient public administration. For this it is important to move towards a proactive and strategic approach of leading to the future, rather than the existing paradigm of managing the present. The course is designed to provide the students of the Public Administration MA programme with the tools and proceedings of such a forward strategic management (e.g. Balanced Scorecard, SWOT-Analysis and so on). Besides the students should get to know new approaches like for example a “public value management”. Particular attention will also be devoted to the “management of the unexpected”, the “management of crisis and catastrophes” and “risk management”.

 

Based on the rights to a “good governance” and “good administration” the management of performance and quality management is an important duty for every administration. Therefore several conceptions of quality management systems (like TQM, CAF, ISO) will be analysed and tested for their practicability.

Quality awards will be introduced as opportunities to receive “best-practice-examples”. Furthermore a comparative review about quality management in a few selected European states is given.

Finally the students should be aware, which problems and risks may arise from the existing quality management systems and in which aspects quality potentials for the future can be detected.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 20
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 25
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and  Final Examination-30

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the principles of Strategic and Quality Management, graduates know relevant tools and methods ;

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems in the sphere of Strategic and Quality Management ;

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information;

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Heuristic Method
  • Case study
  • Brain storming
  • Role and Situation playing
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation/ shot prsentation/ working groups -40

Midterm - 20

Final Exam - 40

Required Literature

Robert S. Kaplan und David P. Norton (1992): The Balanced Scorecard - Measures that Drive Performance. In: Harvard Business Review 1/2, pp. 71-79.

 

Moore, Mark (1998): Creating Public Value. Strategic Management in Government, Cambridge/London: Harvard University

 

Bryson, John M. (2004): Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations: A Guide to Strengthening and Sustaining

 

Lubin, David /Esty Daniel (2010) The sustainability Imperative, in: Harvard Business Review, May 2010, pp. 44-50.

 

Jocelyne Bourgon (2009) New Directions in Public Administration, Serving Beyond the Predictable, http://ppa.sagepub.com/content/24/3/309

 

Drewry, Gavin/Greve, Carsten/Tanquerel, Thierry (2005), Contracts, Performance Measurement and Accountability in the Public Sector, Amsterdam 2005

 

Bouckaert, Geert/Halligan, John (2008): Managing Performance: International Comparisons, London/New York: Routledge.

 

Žurga, Gordana (2008): Quality management in public administrations of the EU

member states: comparative analysis. Ljubljana.

 

In german language:

 

Proeller, Isabella (2007): Strategische Steuerung für den Staat. Internationale Ansätze im Vergleich, Gütersloh: Bertelsmann

 

Jock, Christian (2009): Qualitätsmanagement in Europa – Entwicklungen, Probleme, Ausblick. In: Hill, H. (Ed.): Verwaltungsmodernisierung im europäischen Vergleich. Baden-Baden, pp. 35-59.

 

Hill, Hermann (2008): Qualitätsmanagement im 21. Jahrhundert - ein Neuansatz. In: Die öffentliche Verwaltung, Jg. 61, H. 19, pp. 789-797.

 

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

N/A

Additional Information/Conditions

On the one hand the Lecturer will deliver traditional lectures to the students. On the other hand interactive teaching methods will be actively applied during the sessions. The students should also work together in teams and present the results of this group works in short oral presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Territorial Organisation and Decentralisation / ტერიტორიული მოწყობა და დეცენტრალიზაცია

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr. Giorgi Khubua

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Giorgi Khubua

giorgi.khubua@tum.de

 

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Master Program in Public Administration.

Modul IV -  Organization and Management

Required

Course Goal

The students will have deep and systematic  knowledge about following themes:

  • Institutional structures, the functional responsibilities and the decision-making processes at the local level of government.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS
  • Contact Hours per Semester-15
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 30
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and final Examination- 30

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the Principles of Local Self-Governments. Student knows:

·          institutional structure of local government systems in Germany and Georgia;

·          Local government systems in Germany and in Georgia and about the necessities and standards of European Charter of Self-Government;

 

·          functional responsibilities, resources and organization of local governments;

·          intergovernmental relations between state/ central government and local government

·          principles of local decision-making; actor-constellations

·          reform discourses and strategies in local democracy and participatory reforms; their impacts and consequences

 

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems about the Local Self-Governments ;

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information using of the comparative analysis of German and Georgian Local Self- Government systems. Graduates can make innovative synthesis using of the court  practice;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Ability for study

Student can analyse the character of studying process and make  stategical planning on high level, direct studying process independently.

Values

Student can avaluation of own and others’ atttude about the democratic and legal values and take a part in establishment of new values.

 

·          institutional structure of local government systems in Germany and Georgia;

·          functional responsibilities, resources and organization of local governments;

·          intergovernmental relations between state/ central government and local government

·          principles of local decision-making; actor-constellations

·          reform discourses and strategies in local democracy and participatory reforms; their impacts and consequences

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Heuristic Method
  • Case study
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation -40

Midterm - 20

Final Exam - 40

Required Literature

Dieter Haschke: Local Government Administration in Germany

http://www.iuscomp.org/gla/literature/localgov.htm

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

European Charter of Local Self-Government

http://conventions.coe.int/Treaty/Commun/QueVoulezVous.asp?NT=122&CM=1&CL=ENG

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Cost-Benefit Analysis/ ekonomikuri kontroli da analizi

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr.Dr. h.c. Andreas Knorr

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Andreas Knorr

knorr@uni-speyer.de

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint TSU-DHV Speyer Master’s Program in Public Administration.

Module  V – Budget and Finances

Required

Course Goal

The students will have deep and sistematic knowledge about the cost-benefit analysis and additional tools in economic policy design and and assessment. They will learn the basic steps of these analytical tools and are instructed about potential shortcomings and errors in their application to real-world problems. As discounting is crucially important in every cost-benefit analysis, the lecture will additionally focus on discounting itself with special consideration of the choice and on uncertainty risk.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester-15
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 30
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and Final Examination - 30

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the cost-benefit analysis, planing the economic policy, addditional measures and mechanisms for evaluation. Graduates know basic steps of analitical tools and they are able to forsee future risks and results ;

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems in economic, among them, foreseeing future risks and searching new, original ways to solve them;

Ability for conclusion

Formation of well-founded conclusion basis of the critical analysis of difficult and incomplete information in economic;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation – 40   Midterm - 20

Final Exam –40

Required Literature

·          Field, B.C./ Field, M.K.: Environmental Economics – An Introduction, 5th edition, New York 2009.

·          Fuguitt, D./Wilcox, S.J.: Cost-Benefit Analysis for Public Sector Decision Makers, Westport 1999.

·          Mishan, E.J./Quah, E.: Cost Benefit Analysis, 5th edition, New York 2007.

·          Pearce, P./Atkinson, G./Mourato, S.: Cost-Benefit Analysis and the Environment – Recent Developments, Paris 2006.

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

N/A

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

Contents of the Course

 

N

Topic of the Lecture/Seminar/Practicum/Laborotory work etc.

Literature (with according page numbers)

1

I.          Market Organisation and Market Failure

- Market Organisation and the Consequences for the Economy

- Theory of Market Failure

- Natural Monopolies, Externalities, …

 

 

Ellig, J. (Hrsg.): Dynamic competition and public policy: technology, innovation, and antitrust issues, Cambridge (Mass.), 2001.

 

Shermer, M. (2008), The Mind of the Market – Compassionate Apes, Competitive Humans, and Other Tales from Evolutionary Economics, New York.

Scherer, F./D. Ross: Industrial market structure and economic performance, 3. Auflage, Boston 1990.

 

2

II. Regulation

- Theory of Regulation – Positive Theory, Normative Theory

- Aims of Regulation

- Regulatory Instruments

- Regulatory Failure

- Public Sector Regulation

 

Viscusi, W.K./J. Harrington/J. Vernon: Economics of Regulation and Antitrust, 4th edition, Cambridge (Mass.) und London 2005.

Laffont, J.-J.: Regulation and Development, Cambridge u.a. 2005.

 

3

III.         Competition Policy

           1)   Actors and Aims of Competition Policy

           2)   Competition Policy on Specific Sectors – Case Studies

           3)   Competition Policy in the European Union

 

Gal, M.: Competition Policy for Small Market Economies, Cambridge (Mass.) und London, 2003.

High, J. (Hrsg.): Competition, Cheltenham/Northhampton 2002.

Motta, M.: Competition Policy. Theory and Practice, Cambridge 2004.

OECD: Competition and Trade Policies. Their Interaction, Paris 1984.

Scherer, F.: Competition Policies for an Integrated World Economy, Washington 1994.

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Accounting and reporting in the public sector/ buRalteria da xarjTaRricxva sajaro mmarTvelobaSi

Author/Authors

Zurab Tolordava

Lecturer/Lecturers

Zurab Tolordava     Ministry of Finance ,

  Treasury Service

  Head of Accounting Methodology and Analysi s         Department

Mob :  577051971; 599912965. 

Tel :  8322261524; 8322217487

E-mail: z.tolordava@yahoo.com

Course Code

 

Course Status 

1. Faculty of Law

2.   Master Program Public Administration , Module V Budget and Finance

3. Mandatory

4.  The course is held in Georgian language

Course Goal

In this module students are taught the following issues : the methodology of financial accounting and reporting in public sector; Specifics of accounting and reporting, rules, principles and methods by budgets funded organizations; Budget execution with the principles of Treasury Services, Implementation of the budget and the principles of integration of financial reporting by the budget organization.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

·          3 ECTS ;

·          Contact Hours per Semester - 20;

·          Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester - 30;

·          Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and final Examination 25 hours.

 

Course Admission Prerequisites

·          Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Students have deep and systematic knowledge of the methodology of financial accounting and reporting in public sector; Specifics of accounting and reporting, rules, principles and methods by budgets funded organizations; The student realizes the importance of Implementation of the budget and the principles of integration of financial reporting by the budget organization.

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

The student is able to find new, original ways of complex Problems’ solution in the field of accounting and reporting in public sector.

Course Content

Annex 1.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Evaluation Criteria are fully based on the rules of Tbilisi State University:

  • Attendance and participation 40%
  • Midterm 20%
  • Final exam 40%
  • Final estimation 100%

Required Literature

Required Literature :

  1. The instructions about “Accounting of Budget Funded Organizations” approved by the order of Minister of Finance N 1321  on December 28, 2007 ;
  2. The instructions about “Implementation Rules of the State Treasury Service Organisations” approved by the order of Minister of Finance N 13 18  on December 28, 2007
  3.   Approval of the accounting forms of budget funded organizations ” approved by the order of Minister of Finance N 364 on April 16, 2008.
  4. The Budget Code of Georgia

Web : www.matsne.gov.ge

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

1.     The IMF "Government Finance Statistics 2001“ ;

 

2.     The Law of Georgia "Accounting and Reporting Regulation";

  1. "Budget classification of Georgia" approved by the order of Minister of Finance N 672  on August  25 , 2010;
  2. “Approval of the Primary accounting documents and accounting registers forms of the State Budget Organizations” approved by the order of Minister of Finance №511  on July 28, 2004 ;

 

 

              

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annex 1

 

  Course Content

N

Topic

Learning material

1

lecture : 1-2

Accounting Basics of Budget Funded Organizations

 

The instructions about “Accounting of Budget Funded Organizations”

2

  lecture : 3-4

Principles of Treasury service and Budget implementation by the Treasury account

 

The instructions about “Implementation Rules of the State Treasury Service Organisations”

3

   lecture : 5-6

  Accounting of stocks and flows by the Budgets funded organizations

 

The instructions about “Accounting of Budget Funded Organizations”

 

Forms of Primary accounting documents and accounting registers of the State Budget Organizations

4

lecture : 7-8

Reporting by the budget funded organizations

 

Forms of Primary accounting documents and accounting registers of the State Budget Organizations

5

lecture: 9-10

Accounting Reform, aim of reform and its progress in public sector

Exercise: accrued expenses: assets and liabilities; Balance sheet

 

“Accounting Reform Strategy” approved by the order of Minister of Finance

  Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Human Resources Management/

personalis marTvis menejmenti

Author/Authors

Jörg Senn

Lecturer/Lecturers

Jörg Senn

Visiting Lecturer

joergsenn@yahoo.de

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Module  VI - Staff and Management

Required

Course Goal

The participants will

-           have deep and systematic knowlegde in the fields of human resources management (HRM);

-           get an understanding of HRM as an strategic management approach including the links to organisational development and organisational performance.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 2 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 10
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester-20
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and Final Examination- 20

Course Admission Prerequisites

-           Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about Human Resource Managment.

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Evaluation components:

-           Attandance and Participation / Working Groups – 40

-           Midterm - 20

-           Written exam - 40

Required Literature

Handout.

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

Will be provided during the course, if applicable.

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

 

 


Annex I

Contents of the Course

 

N

Topic of the Lecture/Seminar/Practicum/Laborotory work etc.

Literature (with according page numbers)

1

- Section 1: a) Introduction into HRM

                 b) Recruitment / Selection / Onboarding [1]

 

 

2

- Section 2: Performance Management / Management by Objectives / Staff Talks

 

 

3

- Section 3: Learning Organisation / Instruments of Participation and Feedback

 

 

4

- Section 4: Employment Conditions  (incl. Compensation, Benefits and Incentives)

 

 

5

- Section 5: Career  Development / Training / Talent Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Civil Service Law/ სამოხელეო სამართალი

 

Author/Authors

Paata Turava

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Paata Turava, TSU

¿    e-mail: paata .turava@tsu.ge

  ( : È : 577 55 33 89

 

Course Code

 

Course Status 

1.       Faculty of Law

2. Master Program, module VI Staff and Management

3. Mandatory

Course Goal

S tudents to be able to use their knowledge in the field of Administrative Procedure Law and the Administrative Law taking into the consideration the specifics of Civil Service Law. The students will learn main institutes of Civil Service Law.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

·          2 ECTS ;  

·          Contact Hours per Semester - 1 0 ;

·            Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester - 2 5;               

·          Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and final Examination - 15 hours .

Course Admission Prerequisites

Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

The students are given deep and systematic knowledge in Civil Service Law.

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

The student can find new and original solutions of complex problems in the field of Public Service Law.

Values

Estimation of legal values independently and taking part into creation of new values.

 

Course Content

Annex 1.

 

Teaching/Lea rning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  •  Case study
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Evaluation Criteria are fully based on the rules of Tbilisi State University:

  • Attendance and participation - 10 points
  • Thesis - 10 points
  • Midterms - 20 points (2 midterms - 40 points )
  • Final exam - 40 points .

The final examination is held at the end of semester in written form. The subject is passed successfully when a student receives at least 50% of the final exam estimation.

Required Literature

1.     The guide for General Administrative Law

            (Team of authors: Zurab Adeishvili... Paata Turava... Dimitri Kitoshvili... Tbilisi, 2005.

2.     The guide for General Administrative Law

               Paata Turava , Natia Tskepladze,Tbilisi, 2010.   

  TSU library

 

 

                                                                                                                                                   Annex  1

Course Content

N

The topics of lectures

1

Introduction.

The first working hour will devoted to the clearance of the subject of the learning course. The system of the course and main sources of the course should be explained to the students. The focus will be on the constitutional and legal grounds of the subject and the determination of the scope of the General Administration and the Administrative Procedure Code.

2

Main and principles of Civil Service Law.

3

State Politics in Civil Serivce Law. Organizational support to the policy-makin g processes.

4

Types of public servants and Civil Service.

5

Public servant as a subject with main rights

6

The duties of a public servant

7

General rules of public servant s’ behaviour . Disciplinary misconduct

8

Rights and guarantees of public servants

9

Beginning of official -legal relations, change and termination

1 0

Legal mechanisms to protect the right of a public servant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Culture and Ethics in Public Administration / საჯარო მმართველობის კულტირა და ეთიკა

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr. Giorgi Khubua ( giorgi.khubua@tsu.ge ) & Ass. iur. Claudia Hipp (hipp@uni-speyer.de)

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Giorgi Khubua ( giorgi.khubua@tsu.ge ) & Ass. iur. Claudia Hipp (hipp@uni-speyer.de)

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Master´s Program in Public Administration at TSU in cooperation with the German University of Administrative Sciences Speyer.

Module VI – Staff and Management

Required

Course Goal

The main goal of the course is to give the students deep and systematic knowledge about good administration and the values of democratic structure. Participants will know different mechanisms and tools how an ethical infrastructure in professional life can be set up.

 

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 2 ECTS;
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 10
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 25
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and Final Examination – 15

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

  Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the necessities of the ethic and legal principles ;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate in the sphere of ethic in public administration to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

 

Values

Student can avaluation of the own and others atttude about the legal and ethical values and take a part in establishment of new values.

 

Course Content

1. lecture –

- Introduction, Group Work, Definition of Ethics, Values in Public Sector and Change of Values, NPM, Distinction between Law and Ethics, Task for at Home

2. & 3. Lecture –

- Legal Theory concerning Ethics, Ethical Measures in Georgian Public Administration

4. lecture –

- Repetition of the session on Wednesday, presentations of the homework

- presentations of different national and international organizations and measures which aim to ensure and improve ethical standards in public administration

- advantages and disadvantages of ethics and ethical measures – sum up

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance and participation/ presentation/ working groups -40

Midterm - 20

Final Exam - 40

Required Literature

Will be provided during the course:

-American Society for Public Administration, ASPA CODE OF ETHICS,

http://www.aspanet.org/public/ASPA/Resources/Code_of_Ethics/ASPA/Resources/Code%20of%20Ethics1.aspx?hkey=acd40318-a945-4ffc-ba7b-18e037b1a858

- OECD, PUMA Policy Brief, Public Management occasional papers No. 14, Ethics in the Public service: Current issues and practice, 1996, http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/59/60/1899269.pdf; 13/02/2012.

- The European Code of Good Administrative Behavior, http://www.ombudsman.europa.eu/resources/code.faces ; 13/02/2012.

- Anti-Corruption Network country monitoring reports, http://www.oecd.org/corruption/acn/anticorruptionnetworkcountrymonitoringreports.htm; 13/02/2012.

Links sent by Email "learn more about corruption", just watch: http://www.transparency.org/whatwedo

here you can find the Corruption Index of nearly all countries from TI:

http://www.transparency.org/whatwedo/pub/corruption_perceptions_index_2012

and here is the report of TI about Georgia: http://www.transparency.org/country#GEO

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

N/A

Additional Information/Conditions

On the one hand the Lecturers will deliver traditional lectures to the students. On the other hand interactive teaching methods will be actively applied during the sessions. The students should also work together in teams and present the results of their group works in short oral presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Change Management/ ცვლილებების მენეჯმენტი

Author/Authors

Dr. Gerhard Fuckner

 

Lecturer/Lecturers

Dr. Gerhard Fuckner

 

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Module VI – Staff and Management

Required

Course Goal

The goal of the course is giving the students deep and systematic knowledge how to organize the changes, implementation in organisation, especially, in public sector.

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 2 ECTS
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 10
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester- 25
  • Time for Preparing and Taking Midterm  and final examination -15

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the   Principles of change Management in Public Administration;

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems;

  Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Ability for study

Student can direct studying process independently.

Course Content

See Annex I.

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Brain storming
  • Role and Situation playing
  • Induction, Deduction, Analyze and Synthesis
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Student evaluation will be based on:

 

Attandance and oral participation/ Presentations and Roleplaying - 40 %

Mid term exam - 20 %

Final Exam - 40%

 

Required Literature

Managing Change in the New Public Sector,by Roger Lovell

Managing Change  and Innovation in the Public Service Organizations, by Stephen P. Osborne and Kerry Brown

Managing Change, by Christopher Maybe (Editor) and Bill Mayon-White (Editor)

Change Handbook : Group Methods for Shaping the Future,  by Peggy Holman (Editor), Tom Devane (Editor)

Change Management Handbook : A Road Map to Corporate Transformation, by Lance A. Berger et al.

The Human Side of Change : A Practical Guide to Organization Redesign, by Timothy J. Galpin

Leading Change, by John P. Kotter

Leading in a Culture of Change, by Michael G. Fullan

Making Sense of Change Management: A Complete Guide to the Models, Tools and Techniques of Organizational Change Management, by Esther Cameron and Mike Green

In German Language:

 

 

Change Management – by Kerstin Stolzenberg and Krischan Heberle

Durch Veränderung zum Erfolg – by Helmut Friedrichsmeier and Heinz Frühauf

http://www.dhv-speyer.de/tiflis

User-Name: TSU

Password: admin2

 

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Communication between the State and Citizen; Communication between Politicans and Civil Serv ants / კომუნიკაცია სახელმწიფოსა და მოქალაქეებს შორის; კომუნიკაცია პოლიტიკოსებსა და საჯარო მოხელეებს შორის

Author/Authors

Dr.Gerhard Fuckner

Ekaterina Basilaia

Lecturer/Lecturers

Dr. Gerhard Fuckner

 

Ekaterina Basilaia

E-mail: ekaterine.basilaia@tsu.ge

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is a mandatory part of the Joint-Master Program in Public Administration.

Module VII- Communication

Required

Course Goal

The participants will have deep and systematic knowledge about the character of “communication”. Communication to empoyees, to the superiors, between polititians and public services and between public services and the citizen ist an essential element of the sucessful operation of the executives.

 

On the base of theoretical topics of communication ( section 1) the students get familiar with some tools to analyse typical situations of communication (secition 2). Afterwards the course will apply the results to the communication beween the public services to the political level (section 3) and from public services to the citizen (section 4).

 

 

Number of Credits and Distribution of Hours According to Student’s Workload (ECTS)

  • 3 ECTS
  • Contact Hours per Semester- 20
  • Hours of Student’s Independent Work per Semester-30
  • Time for Preparing and Taking midterm and  final Examination- 25

Course Admission Prerequisites

  • Without any prerequisites

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Perception

Student has deep and systematical knowledge about the    basic characters of communication and types of communication;

Ability for using the knowledge in practice

Graduates are able to Search new and original ways to solve complex problems;

Ability for communication

Student can communicate to academic and professional society in written and oral form in national language and also in foreign language with using of standarts of academic honesty and the challenges of informational-communicational technologies.

Course Content

See Annex 1

Teaching/Learning Methods

 

  • Verbal/ Oral Method.
  • Discussion/ Debates
  • Role and Situation playing
  • Explanation Method
  • Action Oriented Teaching
  • The Method of Written Work

Evaluation Criteria

Attandance  and Participation / Working Groups – 40

Midterm - 20

Written exam – 40

Required Literature

Handout.

Additional Literature and other Teaching Materials

Schulz von Thun, Friedemann (1981): The square of Communication. Excerpt from the first chapter of Miteinander Reden. Reinbek, translated by Katrin Krollpfeiffer, in: Friedemann Schulz von Thun, Six Tools for Clear Communication, published by Institut für Kommunikation, Hamburg

Schulz von Thun, Friedemann (2004): Communication an Social Competence, in: “Von den Besten profitieren”, in: Friedemann Schulz von Thun, Six Tools for Clear Communication, published by Institut für Kommunikation, Hamburg

Christopf Thomann/ Friedemann Schulz von Thun: People and Diversity – The Thoman-Riemann-Model for the Working World, in: Friedemann Schulz von Thun, Six Tools for Clear Communication, published by Institut für Kommunikation, Hamburg

Geert Hofstede, Gerd Jan Hofstede, Michael Minkov (2010): Cultures and Organizations. New York

Stefanie Delhees, Karl-Rudolf Korte, Floran Schartau, Niko Switek, Kristina Weissenbach (2008): Wohlfahrtsstaatliche Reformkommunikation. Baden Baden

Demo.net - Introducing eParticipation. Demo-net booklet serices
no 1.
http://www.ifib.de/publikationsdateien/Introducing_eParticipation_DEMO-net_booklet_1.pdf (31.03.2011)

 

Poiwer-Point slides are being distributed

Additional Information/Conditions

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching  Course

Course Title

 

Budget planning and management; Funding public expenditure/ biujetis dagegmva da marTva/sajaro xarjebis dafinanseba

Author/Authors

Prof. Dr. Tea Kasradze

Lecturer/Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Tea Kasradze

Doctor of economic science

Tel/fax: 98 20 84; 877 42 02 37;

e-mail: Tkasradze@hotmail.com; Tea.kasradze@undp.org.ge

Course Code

 

Course Status 

Faculty of Law

This Course is intended for Master Students Level and is an elective part of the Master Program in Public Administration.

Module VIII – Elective

elective